October 03, 86

Vol. 02 , No. 01   



THE DIRECTOR'S CORNER
JOHN ROTH

Thanks to the imaginative suggestions of CMC's students and faculty, the Athenaeum is pleased to offer a schedule of distinguished guest speakers and special events during the first semester. More details about these occasions will be forthcoming, as the dates approach, but we hope that our autumn menu is appealing. Please save the listing for future reference, and note on your calendar now those events of interest to you.

All who wish to attend a luncheon or dinner in conjunction with an autumn program are reminded that they must reserve space with the Athenaeum secretary at least two days in advance. Meal card numbers from students are required. Other friends of the College are welcome, too; their fee is normally $5.00 for lunch and $8.00 for dinner, payable in advance by check to the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum.




THE FELLOWS' TURN
CAROLYN McFERRAN

Modeled on the literary and scientific dining clubs of 19th-century London, the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum was developed to promote both intellectual and social exchange at CMC. It provides an informal, yet elegant atmosphere in which students can meet classmates, faculty, and distinguished guests. This "club" exists for students, so your input concerning new events or guest speakers, as well as menu suggestions, is important. As the new Athenaeum student fellows, Rob Urstein and I welcome your ideas-just let us know what you would like to see at the Athenaeum.

Rob, whose home is in Long Beach, spent his summer in Washington, D.C., working with the historian of the National Portrait Gallery, a branch of the Smithsonian Institution. Now a junior, he will continue his studies in history and literature. I rejoin the rest of the pioneers of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program (PPE) this fall to continue writing and discussing material in tutorials. Determined to make the most of my last summer before graduating, I returned to my home in Wheatridge to work and enjoy the amenities of Colorado. I also had the opportunity to travel to Vancouver, British Columbia, during August to see the Expo '86 and explore the surrounding countryside. With the fall semester underway, Rob and I look forward to the projected program of events.

Since the Athenaeum serves a diverse group of persons, we offer a wide variety of functions each year. Special events, such as Sunday brunch or the Madrigal Feast, provide students the opportunity to wear something other than shorts and a T-shirt while enjoying a meal away from Collins. These programs are organized by the Athenaeum staff and normally require a ticket, which may be obtained by completing a reservation slip printed in The Fortnightly and returning it to the Athenaeum. Regular events, including afternoon teas and the "open forum" lunches on Wednesdays, are open to all, and no reservation is required. For events with limited publicity sponsored by CMC clubs, organizations, or departments, reservations are collected via a sign-up sheet circulated by the organizer. Meal card numbers are required from all students, so if you attend a meal you have signed up for at the Athenaeum and show up at Collins, the computer will show "meal eaten." Use the monthly calendars found in The Fortnightly to help you keep track of upcoming events. The Athenaeum exists for CMC students, so take advantage of its programming and enjoy!




Evening of Jazz
SANDY OWEN, piano
BRENT MCMUNN, oboe
PAUL CARMEN, saxophone
Monday, September 8, 1986

The 1986-87 Athenaeum season gets under way with the appearance of a deft "double play combination," Sandy Owen and Scott Ostler. The current "home stand" opens Monday evening, September 8, when jazz musician Sandy Owen-accompanied by oboist Brent McMunn and saxophonist Paul Carmen-offers a concert of his unique piano stylings, following an Athenaeum reception and dinner. "A bright articulate soloist with superior technique and a firm grasp of tempo and mood"-that's how Cashbox magazine reviews Owen's performances. His work includes numerous albums, among them Soliloquy (1982), Themes in Search of a Movie (1985), and, most recently, Boogie Woogie Rhythm and Blues (1986). An entrepreneur who started Ivory Records in 1982, Sandy Owen and his friends will give us a dazzling opening night.




Sports in America
SCOTT OSTLER
Thursday, September 11, 1986

Readers of the Los Angeles Times sports pages will be well acquainted with our second guest, Scott Ostler, who will come to the Athenaeum for conversation on Thursday evening, September 11. Ostler joined the Times in 1977, covering the Angels, Dodgers, and Lakers before becoming a nationally syndicated columnist. Co-author of Winnin' Times (1986), a book about the Lakers soon to be published by Macmillan, Ostler is a five-time winner of the California Sportswriter of the Year Award. This perceptive and humorous critic of both intercollegiate and professional athletics is sure to spark lively discussion. Sign up for this evening by using the reservation coupon in The Fortnightly.




Media and the Political Event
HELEN THOMAS
JOE SCOTT
EDWARD FISKE
LEONARD APCAR '75
MICHAEL McCURRY
BILL BOYARSKY
THOMAS GOLDSTEIN
Wednesday and Thursday, September 16+17, 1986

The role of the press in shaping and defining the political process in the United States is the focus of an Athenaeum conference on September 16 and 17 journalists and political experts from across the country will participate in a round of discussions, considering the manner in which the media influence the nature of election campaigns and the techniques used by campaign managers to control media coverage of their candidates.

Helen Thomas, White House bureau chief for United Press International (UPI), opens the two-day conference. Her address, "Media and the Political Event," follows a reception and dinner beginning at 5:30 p.m. in the Security Pacific Dining Room.

The conference resumes on Wednesday, September 17, at 11:15 a.m., with remarks from Joe Scott, a political columnist who has worked for a number of California newspapers. Mr. Scott's speech is followed by an address by Edward B. Fiske, education editor for The New York Times, who considers the way in which press coverage alters the event it describes.

Later, that day Leonard Apcar '75, a writer for The Wall Street Journal, and Michael McCurry, communications director for Gov. Bruce Babbitt of Arizona, make presentations and answer questions at 4:00 p.m. Following a reception and dinner beginning at 5:30 p.m., Bill Boyarsky, city-county editor for the Los Angeles Times, and Thomas Goldstein, professor of jounalism at U.C. Berkeley and author of The News at Any Cost: How Journalists Compromise Their Ethics to Shape the News (1985), close the conference with a review of the major questions related to press coverage of political events.





AUTUMN PROGRAMS

Monday, September 8, 1986 Sandy Owen, jazz pianist, is joined by oboist Brent McMunn and sax player Paul Carmen for a concert -including cuts from Mr. Owen's recent album, Boogie Woogie Rhythm and Blues (1986)-following a reception and dinner beginning at 5:30 p.m. (Use the attached sign-up form to make your reservation.)

Thursday, September 11,1986 Scott Ostler, sports editorialist for the Los Angeles Times, appraises current baseball and football scenes. Reception, 5:30 p.m., dinner, 6:00 p.m., with discussion after dinner. (Use the attached sign-up form to make your reservation.)

Tuesday-Wednesday, September 16-17, 1986 Symposium, "Media and the Political Event," a series of presentations focusing on the impact that journalism and political campaigns have on each other. Featured speakers include Helen Thomas, Joe Scott, Edward Fiske, Len Apcar '75, Michael McCurry, Bill Boyarsky, and Thomas Goldstein. (See page 1 for further details, and use the attached sign-up form for reservations.)

Monday-Tuesday, September 22-23, 1986 Jean Kilbourne, filmmaker of The Naked Truth: Advertising's Image of Women, joins issues involving the economics of advertising and sex-role stereotyping. On both evenings Ms. Kilbourne's program will be preceded by a 5:30 p.m. reception and dinner.

Monday-Tuesday, September 29-30, 1986 Sonja Landau, chair of the board of directors of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and former national chair of Women for Reagan-Bush '84, draws on her experience in public life to address issues of current concern. Reception at 5:30 p.m., with dinner and discussion following.

Wednesday-Saturday, October 8-11, 1986 Dinner Theater at the Athenaeum. Under the direction of Professor Leonard Pronko, the Five-College Players present The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). Dinner, 6:00 p.m.; the play follows at 7:30. Reservations available through Pomona College's theater department, 626-7530. Student admission for the dinner and play is $6.00 (with meal card number); for faculty and staff the charge is $10.00.

Wednesday-Thursday, October 15-16, 1986 Michael Graber '74, mountaineer and photographer, shares his recent adventures. On both evenings there will be a reception at 5:30 p.m., with dinner and conversation following.

Wednesday-Thursday, October 29-30, 1986 Joyce Carol Oates, novelist, reflects on contemporary American literature. A detailed schedule for Ms. Oates's visit, which is part of CMC's 40th anniversary celebrations, will appear in a later edition of The Fortnightly.

Tuesday, November 4, 1986 Election Returns. Professor Alan Heslop probes election results. Big-screen television, conversation, and snacks beginning at 8:00 p.m.

Thursday, November 6, 1986 Thomas Leabhart, professor and resident artist at Pomona College, describes and performs the art of mime. Reception, 5:30 p.m.., dinner, 6:00 p.m., with lecture, performance, and discussion following dinner.

Monday-Tuesday, November 10-11, 1986 Symposium on Artificial Intellgence. A series of presentations about the "cutting edge" of computing. Featured speakers include Donald A. Norman, UCSD, and James L. Flanaghan, AT&T Bell Laboratories. A detailed schedule follows later.

Monday-Tuesday, November 17-18, 1986 Vladimir Frumkin, professor of Russian at Oberlin College, discusses the political significance of contemporary music and poetry in the Soviet Union. On both evenings Professor Frumkin's presentations follow a reception and dinner beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Monday, November 24, 1986 Norma Goodrich, author of a landmark book, King Arthur (1985), describes her scholarly sleuthing to reveal the true identity of the legendary ruler. Reception, 5:30 p.m., dinner, 6:00 p.m., with Ms. Goodrich's presentation following.





OTHER ATHENAEUM EVENTS

Afternoon Tea. Beginning Monday, September 8, 1986, and every Monday through Friday thereafter, tea and sweets are offered in the Athenaeum library, 3:00-4:30 p.m.

The Wednesday Lunch. Beginning September 10, 1986, one of the small Athenaeum dining rooms will be reserved each Wednesday for students and faculty who wish to drop in for lunch and conversation. No prior sign-up is required.

Sunday Brunch. Beginning Sunday, November 2, 1986, and on the first Sunday of each month thereafter, the Athenaeum will serve its famous Sunday brunch. Make reservations early. A special Sunday brunch in conjunction with the dinner theater is scheduled for October 12, 1986.

Additional Special Occasions. The following events are planned for the autumn season. Reservations are required.

Wednesday, October 8-Saturday, October 11, 1986, dinner theater: The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). Tickets required; call 626-7530 for reservations.

Tuesday, October 28-Sunday, November 2, 1986, CMC's 40th birthday celebrations. (Watch for more information in the next Fortnightly.)

December 4-6 and 10-12, 1986, the Madrigal dinners. Tickets are available to students (with meal ticket) for $7.00; to faculty and staff for $18.00; and to the public for $27.50 per person.




HARALD BAUER DEPARTS

Reluctantly the Athenaeum announces that its resident manager, Harald Bauer, has resigned to pursue business interests in the catering field. For four years Harald has served CMC graciously with his inimitable blend of culinary and managerial expertise. Most difficult of all will be replacing his dedication to long hours of work. All the best to you and your family, Harald, and please visit the Athenaeum often!

President Jack L. Stark has appointed a search committee to find a new Athenaeum manager, and he hopes to name Harald's successor shortly. However, Harald contines to assist us during the transition period. Meanwhile, the Athenaeum kitchen remains in the hands of Terri Moreman, Jackie Hawkins, Jean Daugherty, and Kenny Ryder. Carol Bovett returns as the Athenaeum's secretary; building attendants are Gail Shepherd and Thuy Nguyen. Other key positions are filled by Keith Barth and Elizabeth Montgomery, the Athenaeum's student managers; Carolyn M. McFerran and Robert M. Urstein, the 1986-87 Athenaeum student fellows; and Professor Ron Teeples, who succeeds Professor Sue Mansfield as chair of the Athenaeum advisory committee.




JOBS

Each year the Athenaeum employs many CMC students. If you are looking for interesting work in comfortable surroundings, contact Keith Barth or Elizabeth Montgomery, Athenaeum student managers, who maintain an office in the west end of the building.




THE FELLOWS' TURN
CAROLYN McFERRAN '87

Modeled on the literary and scientific dining clubs of 19th-century London, the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum was developed to promote both intellectual and social exchange at CMC. It provides an informal, yet elegant atmosphere in which students can meet classmates, faculty, and distinguished guests. This "club" exists for students, so your input concerning new events or guest speakers, as well as menu suggestions, is important. As the new Athenaeum student fellows, Rob Urstein and I welcome your ideas-just let us know what you would like to see at the Athenaeum.

Rob, whose home is in Long Beach, spent his summer in Washington, D.C., working with the historian of the National Portrait Gallery, a branch of the Smithsonian Institution. Now a junior, he will continue his studies in history and literature. I rejoin the rest of the pioneers of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program (PPE) this fall to continue writing and discussing material in tutorials. Determined to make the most of my last summer before graduating, I returned to my home in Wheatridge to work and enjoy the amenities of Colorado. I also had the opportunity to travel to Vancouver, British Columbia, during August to see the Expo '86 and explore the surrounding countryside. With the fall semester underway, Rob and I look forward to the projected program of events.

Since the Athenaeum serves a diverse group of persons, we offer a wide variety of functions each year. Special events, such as Sunday brunch or the Madrigal Feast, provide students the opportunity to wear something other than shorts and a T-shirt while enjoying a meal away from Collins. These programs are organized by the Athenaeum staff and normally require a ticket, which may be obtained by completing a reservation slip printed in The Fortnightly and returning it to the Athenaeum. Regular events, including afternoon teas and the "open forum" lunches on Wednesdays, are open to all, and no reservation is required. For events with limited publicity sponsored by CMC clubs, organizations, or departments, reservations are collected via a sign-up sheet circulated by the organizer. Meal card numbers are required from all students, so if you attend a meal you have signed up for at the Athenaeum and show up at Collins, the computer will show "meal eaten." Use the monthly calendars found in The Fortnightly to help you keep track of upcoming events. The Athenaeum exists for CMC students, so take advantage of its programming and enjoy!

ROBERT URSTEIN '88

The Athenaeum's fall program series got off to a terrific start in early September with a jazz concert from pianist Sandy Owen and an exciting evening with sports columnist Scott Ostler. These events were followed by a two-day symposium on political journalism and Dr. Jean Kilbourne's visit, which offered an insightful analysis of American advertising. Presently, the Athenaeum's dinner theater performances of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) are being enthusiastically received. If this beginning is any indication, the quality of the Athenaeum programming this year will be outstanding.

We want every student to feel at home here. Thus, we have planned a diverse calendar, and we hope it offers something of interest for everyone.

The Athenaeum is not just for scholarly interaction-we have other fun and games here, too. On Tuesday evening, October 14, we salute "the boys of summer" with a Baseball Party, when we welcome everyone for an evening of big-screen television and baseball fare. Our creative cooks are setting aside conventional Athenaeum menus in favor of all-American favorites, including hot dogs, chili, and peanuts in the shell. Use the coupon for your reserved seat.

On Tuesday evening, November 4, Alan Heslop, professor of government and director of the Rose Institute, probes this fall's Election Day results. No reservations are necessary. Just drop in for big-screen television, conversation, and snacks beginning at 8:00 p.m.