October 28, 2013

Vol. 29 , No. 04   


View Entire Issue (Vol. 29 , No. 04)


The Warsaw Ghetto Rebellion: A New Look
YEHUDA BAUER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013
LUNCHEON 11:30 a.m.; PROGRAM 12:00 p.m.

In this lunchtime lecture, Professor Bauer will be provide new insights into the history of the largest armed rebellion of Jews that occurred during the Holocaust. In the wake of the mass deportations of some 300,000 Jews from the Warsaw ghetto in 1942, underground Jewish resistance movements formed. They secured arms while calling for the remnant population to resist going to the trains that would take them to their deaths. On April 19, 1943, special German SS and police forces entered Warsaw to crush the rebellion and liquidate the ghetto. Some 750 armed Jewish men and women fought back. The Jewish Fighting Organization (in Polish, the Zydowska Organizacja Bojowa, ZOB) led this effort, but recent research in Israel and Poland has started to identify other disparate groups that participated in uprising. Professor Bauer will provide a closer look at these individual groups and their month-long struggle with the Germans.

Yehuda Bauer is Professor Emeritus of History and Holocaust Studies at the Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Academic Advisor to Yad Vashem. He was born in Prague in 1926 and emigrated to Israel in 1939. He completed his doctorate at Hebrew University with a thesis on the British Mandate of Palestine. Fluent in Czech, Slovak, German, Hebrew, Yiddish, English, French, and Polish, Professor Bauer has written more than 40 books on the Holocaust covering themes such as antisemitism, rescue, resistance, American Jewish responses, survivor testimony, and the early history of Israel. Among his numerous publications are: American Jewry and the Holocaust: The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 1939-1945, Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1981; Jews for Sale?: Nazi-Jewish Negotiations, New Haven: Yale University Press, October 1994, and Rethinking the Holocaust, New Haven, Yale University, 2001.

In 1998, Bauer was awarded the Israel Prize, the highest civilian award in Israel and in 2001 he was elected a member of the Israeli Academy of Science. Bauer has served as advisor to the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance, and Research, and as senior advisor to the Swedish Government on the International Forum on Genocide Prevention.