March 29, 2010

Vol. 25 , No. 10   


View Entire Issue (Vol. 25 , No. 10)


The Tipping Point: How Do Humanistic Studies Count?
ANGUS FLETCHER
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31, 2010

Angus Fletcher is an Orphic seer, a curious universal scholar of Renaissance vintage, a fusion of the best traits of Northrop Frye and Kenneth Burke, his true peers.... His new book on Shakespeare, Marlowe, Donne, Milton and so much more is a marvelous demonstration that cosmology, rhetoric and psychology are not three entities but one. Here they fuse together with the magus Fletcher performing his superb critical alchemy.
-Harold Bloom, author of The Western Canon (1995)

Claremont McKenna College has the distinct privilege of hosting Angus Fletcher as the Podlich Fellow for spring semester 2010 and writer in residence at the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies.

Angus Fletcher is the Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Graduate School at the City University of New York. His research interests include theory of literature, comparative literature, allegory, the literature of nature, Edmund Spenser, and postmodernisms. Professor Fletcher is the author of several works, including Allegory: The Theory of a Symbolic Mode (1964); Time, Space, and Motion in the Age of Shakespeare (2007); A New Theory for American Poetry: Democracy, the Environment, and the Future of Imagination (2006); The Transcendental Masque: An Essay on Miltonís Comus (1972); Colors of the Mind: Conjectures on Thinking in Literature (1991); and The Prophetic Moment: An Essay on Spenser (1971). In 2005 he was awarded the Truman Capote Prize in Literary Criticism, recognizing his A New Theory for American Poetry: Democracy, the Environment, and the Future of Imagination (2006). Professor Fletcher also is the recipient of a 2007 Senior Fellowship from the Endowment of the Humanities.

A previous Fellow of the Guggenheim Foundation, Professor Fletcher was the recipient of a 2007 Senior Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. In 2008-2009 he was the Getty Professor at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles.

In this first of two lectures Professor Fletcher will revisit Sir Charles Snow's 1959 pronouncements on "The Two Cultures" and will discuss a zone of interest shared by the Arts and Sciences, the practice of counting.