October 22, 85

Vol. 01 , No. 04   



THE DIRECTOR'S CORNER
JOHN ROTH

Captain John D. White, commanding officer of the juvenile division of the Los Angeles police department, first came to my attention on Wednesday, June 12, 1985, when the Los Angeles Times described a report he presented to the Police Commission. He had testified that child abuse and sexual exploitation of children have reached epidemic proportions in Los Angeles.

Dr. Jill Anter Wieder '79, a psychologist, knows what Captain White means, because her special area of work includes counseling abused and neglected children. About the time of Captain White's report, Jill and I lunched in Claremont. One topic of conversation led to another, and before we left our table, plans for an Athenaeum symposium were jelling.

"Child Abuse and Neglect: Problems and Prospects for Children in the '80s"-that subject will occupy us at the Athenaeum October 28-30. This symposium coincides with CMC's emphasis on public affairs and offers intriguing ways to focus on such disciplines as psychology and political science. Child abuse and neglect raise a host of tough questions, which may be of special concern to CMC students. Your futures promise not only the responsibilities and challenges of career and profession, but also those of parenthood and citizenship.

In John Updike's recent novel, Rabbit Is Rich (1981), one character painfully reflects that "there seems to be no protection against all the ugliness that is in the world." An Athenaeum symposium can't falsify that proposition, but CMC Professors John Snortum, Marjorie Charlop, and Ralph Rossum have rallied support for the forthcoming conference. With their help-and especially that of alumna Jill Anter Wieder-we have an opportunity to benefit from the expertise of leaders trying to protect children of the '80s from abuse and neglect.

The symposium begins Monday evening, October 28, and continues through Wednesday evening, October 30. Further details about the sessions and the contributors are included in this issue of "The Fortnightly." Make your reservations now and confront a subject that is of more than academic concern.




THE FELLOWS' TURN
LAURA MAY

The Wednesday Lunch is a success, but here is a proposal to make it even better. Although this event was designed in part to provide a serene and pleasant alternative to lunch at Collins Hall-with superior food and without the necessity of the usual advance sign-up at the Athenaeum-the intent is also to encourage interaction and conversation among students and faculty outside of the classroom. Unfortunately, faculty attendance at these lunches has been sparse.

To remedy the imbalance in the student-faculty ratio, I propose that students attending the lunch bring a faculty member with them as their unofficial "meal ticket" In turn, I urge the faculty to appreciate that students would welcome an invitation from their teachers to join them at the Wednesday Lunch, perhaps for further discussion of a topic raised in class or on an important book. Ideally, I believe, faculty-student attendance at these lunches should be balanced 50/50. The closer we come to that ratio, the more we will realize the dreams that Marian Miner Cook and Donald McKenna had in providing the Athenaeum.

Another opportunity for students to enjoy the Athenaeum has been created by the acquisition of VCR equipment, which is presently located in the library. Interested students and faculty may reserve this equipment for showings of movies or video-taped television shows. It is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., whenever the library is not reserved for a previously scheduled event. To sign up, visit the Athenaeum office at least two days before your requested time slot.

Finally, I want to reiterate Professor Roth's comments about the October 28-30 symposium on child abuse. Regardless of our declared academic majors, most of us students are here at CMC because of our interest in the public affairs of our immediate community and the nation as a whole. Child abuse has become and will remain an emotional and controversial issue at the top of our nation's agenda. But beyond the political aspects, the symposium is particularly relevant because we are at an important juncture of our lives. As college students we have only recently left our homes and parents; we are struggling through the separation that occurs as a child becomes an adult. For many of us, however, marriage and parenthood are not too far off. The sooner we educate ourselves for those tremendous responsibilities, the better prepared we will be for that day when children are ours to raise.




CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS FOR CHILDREN IN THE '80s

Child Abuse and Neglect: From Apathy to Hysteria
STAN KATZ
Monday, October 28, 1985 7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m. "Child Abuse and Neglect: From Apathy to Hysteria," Stan J. Katz, director of education and training, Children's Institute International, Los Angeles. (An Athenaeum reception, 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 6:00 p.m., precedes Dr. Katz's keynote address.)

From Trauma to Treatment: the Impact of Child Abuse on the Family System (Part I)
IAN RUSS
Tuesday, October 29, 1985 11:00 a.m.

11:00 a.m. "From Trauma to Treatment: The Impact of Child Abuse on the Family System (Part I)," Ian Russ, research fellow and clinical consultant, Children's Institute International, Los Angeles.

From Trauma to Treatment: the Impact of Child Abuse on the Family System (Part II)
JILL ANTER WIEDER '79
Tuesday, October 29, 1985 12:30 p.m.

12:30 p.m. "From Trauma to Treatment: The Impact of Child Abuse on the Family System (Part II)," Jill Anter Wieder '79, psychologist and director of the early intervention program at the Maple Center, Beverly Hills. (An Athenaeum luncheon at noon precedes Dr. Wieder's address.)

Surviving the System: Social Services and the Abused Child
MARJORIE CHARLOP
JO KAPLAN
IAN RUSS
JOHN SNORTUM
JILL ANTER WIEDER '79
Tuesday, October 29, 1985 3:00 p.m.

3:30 p.m."Surviving the System: Social Services and the Abused Child," an afternoon panel, featuring: Marjorie H. Charlop, assistant professor of psychology, Claremont McKenna College; Jo Kaplan, attorney for the dependency section of the Superior Court, Los Angeles; Ian Russ, research fellow and clinical consultant, Children's Institute International, Los Angeles; John R. Snortum, George C. S. Benson Professor of Public Affairs, Claremont McKenna College; Jill Anter Wieder '79, psychologist and director of the early intervention program at the Maple Center, Beverly Hills.

Child Abuse and Its Abuses
DAVID KIRP
Tuesday, October 29, 1985 7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m. "Child Abuse and Its Abuses," David L. Kirp, professor of public policy, Graduate School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley. (An Athenaeum reception, 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 6:00 p.m., precedes Professor Kirp's address.)

Child Abuse and Neglect
JOHN WHITE
Wednesday, October 30, 1985 12:30 p.m.

12:30 p.m. "Child Abuse and Neglect," Captain John D. White, commanding officer, juvenile division, Los Angeles Police Department. (An Athenaeum luncheon at 12:00 noon precedes Captain White's address.)

Justice for All?: The Perpetrators and Victims of Child Abuse
PAUL BOLAND
DAVID KIRP
RALPH ROSSUM
IAN RUSS
JOHN WHITE
Wednesday, October 30, 1985 3:30 p.m.

3:30 p.m. "Justice for All?: The Perpetrators and Victims of Child Abuse," an afternoon panel, featuring: Paul Boland, supervising judge, criminal division, Superior Court, Los Angeles; David L. Kirp, professor of public policy, Graduate School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley; Ralph A. Rossum, Alice Tweed Tuohy Professor of Government and Ethics, Claremont McKenna College; Ian Russ, research fellow and clinical consultant, Children's Institute International, Los Angeles; Captain John D. White, commanding officer, juvenile division, Los Angeles Police Department.

Child Abuse and the Future of American Society
PAUL BOLAND
Wednesday, October 30, 1985 7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m. "Child Abuse and the Future of American Society," Paul Boland, supervising judge, criminal division, Superior Court, Los Angeles. (An Athenaeum reception, 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 6:00 p.m. precedes Judge Boland's address.)




SYMPOSIUM PARTICIPANTS

Paul Boland, who received his legal training at the University of Southern California Law Center and Georgetown University Law Center, is the supervising judge of the 15 Los Angeles Superior Court departments that hear cases involving parental abuse and neglect of children. From 1970 until his appointment to the Superior Court in early 1981, Judge Boland was a faculty member of UCLA's School of Law, where he served as associate dean.

Marjorie H. Charlop, assistant professor of psychology, Claremont McKenna College, took her Ph.D. at The Claremont Graduate School, specializing in child psychology and behavior modification. Author of numerous articles on autistic children, she is the director of the Claremont Center for the Study of Autism.

Jo Kaplan, a 1969 graduate of UCLA's School of Law, has been a criminal lawyer in Los Angeles for 15 years. An expert on child abuse cases, she serves on a panel of lawyers for the dependency section of the Los Angeles Superior Court. Having taught juvenile law at the Southwestern School of Law, Ms. Kaplan is currently on Los Angeles County task forces investigating how to revamp the social service system and improve relations between that system and the courts.

Stan J. Katz, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist who has been evaluating and treating child abuse and neglect cases since 1975. Trained at Boston University, UCLA, and Children's Hospital of Los Angeles, Dr. Katz is the director of education and training at the Children's institute International in Los Angeles. Recently he served as technical adviser for the Emmy-winning ABC presentation of Something about Amelia (1984), network television's first dramatic movie concerning incest. Dr. Katz also served as technical adviser for the ABC "Afterschool Special" (1972), "'Don't Hit Me, Mom" (1981), and NBC's "Skeezer" (1982) which dealt with emotionally disturbed children.

David L. Kirp, an alumnus of Amherst College and Harvard Law School, is professor of public policy at the Graduate School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley. The author of many important articles and books, including Gender Justice (1987), Professor Kirp has also been associate editor for the Sacramento Bee.

Ralph A. Rossum, Alice Tweed Tuohy Professor of Government and Ethics, Claremont McKenna College, is a specialist on public law and the administration of criminal justice. His books include The Politics of the Criminal Justice System (1978) and Police, Criminal Justice, and the Community (1976). Presently he is the director for a project on juvenile justice reform, being carried out by the Rose Institute for State and Local Government, with funding provided by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U. S. Department of Justice.

Ian Russ is a research fellow and clinical consultant at the Children's Institute International in Los Angeles and also a faculty member of the National College of Juvenile Justice, where he instructs judges on the psychological and social issues of child testimony. Currently completing his doctoral studies in social-clinical psychology at the Wright Institute, Los Angeles, he has a private practice in family and child counseling, and does psychological consultation for elementary and intermediate schools.

John R. Snortum, George C. S. Benson Professor of Public Affairs, Claremont McKenna College, is an expert on criminal justice and behavior. Internationally recognized, Professor Snortum has worked extensively in Sweden, Norway, and Switzerland, where he has investigated penal systems and strategies to deter drunken driving. His courses on "'Theories of Personality" and "Criminal Justice" have long been among the classics of CMC's curriculum.

John D. White studied American history at the University of Miami, Florida, rose to the rank of captain in the Marine Corps and then joined the Los Angeles Police Department in 1966. Elected president of his recruit class, he went on to a variety of patrol and investigative assignments. Following stints in the organized crime-intelligence division and the internal affairs division of the LAPD, he was promoted to the rank of captain in February 1983 and later became commanding officer of the juvenile division. His work includes membership on the advisory boards of the California Juvenile Officers Association and the Juvenile Justice Connection Project.

Jill Anter Wieder, a 1979 graduate of Claremont McKenna College, took both her M.A. and Ph.D. from the California School of Professional Psychology in Los Angeles. Her doctoral research focused on the transition to adulthood in the children of Holocaust survivors. For the last four years she has been working in evaluation and treatment of child abuse. Her current private practice is primarily with children and young adults experiencing problematic life transitions.




THE WEEKS AHEAD:
A Digest of Forthcoming Athenaeum-sponsored Events

Please note the programs scheduled for early next month, because sign-ups will be needed prior to the next issue of "The Fortnightly" on November 1.

On November 4-5, the 1985-86 Phi Beta Kappa, Visiting Scholar, Professor Theodore T. Puck, director of the Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for cancer research, will be on campus. He will give a public lecture at the Athenaeum at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, November 4. This event will be preceded by a reception and dinner at 5:30 p.m., as well as by a lunch-time opportunity to talk with Professor Puck on the same day.

Attention should also be called to International Relations Career Day. Deans of admissions from ten prestigious international relations programs will convene at the Athenaeum October 25 for lunch and a panel discussion beginning at 12:00 noon. Also in an international relations vein, the PBS series "War" (Parts IV and V) continues on November 5 and 7 with Profesor P. Edward Haley and Dean Gaines Post, Jr.

Philosophy and theology command attention in early November. On Wednesday, November 6, two distinguished thinkers, Paul M. van Buren and Clark M. Williamson, will discuss Jewish-Christian relationships at noon and again at dinner. On Thursday, November 7, the CMC department of philosophy and religion sponsors an evening of discussion with members of the joint sciences faculty as part of a series, "Philosophy and the Disciplines." Dinner is at 6:00 p.m., with the discussion following at 7:00 p.m.

October 23, 1985 The Wednesday Lunch" 12:00 noon "War" (Part III with Professor and Lt. Col. Richard Phalan, 4:15 p.m. through dinner)

October 25, 1985 International Relations Career Day, 12:00 noon

October 28-30, 1985 "Child Abuse and Neglect: Problems and Prospects for Children of the '80s"

October 29, 1985 "Trivial Pursuit" and lunch, 12:00 noon

October 30, 1985 "The Wednesday Lunch" 12:00 noon

October 31, 1985 The Athenaeum Halloween Party, 6:00 p.m. (Dinner and dancing preceded by pumpkin-carving in the library during afternoon tea, 3:00-4:30 p.m.)

November 3, 1985 Sunday Brunch, 11:00 a.m.

November 4, 1985 Theodore T. Puck, Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar, 12:00 noon and 5:30 p.m.

November 5, 1985 "Trivial Pursuit" and lunch, 12:00 noon "War" (Part IV with Professor P. Edward Haley, 4:15 p.m. through dinner)

November 6, 1985 "The Wednesday Lunch" 12:00 noon "'Jewish-Christian Relations," with Professors Paul M. van Buren and Clark M. Williamson, 12:00 noon and 5:30 p.m.

November 7, 1985 "War" (Part V with Dean Gaines Post, Jr., 4:15 p.m. through dinner)

November 7, 1985 "Physical Science and Philosophy: An Informal Symposium," dinner 6:00 p.m., with discussion at 7:00 p.m.