Summer Session at CMC

Courses

Course Descriptions and Faculty

Below is a list of the summer program offerings. A number of these courses may satisfy General Education requirements at CMC, serve as prerequisites for other courses, or fulfill requirements in some of CMC's sequences. See the college catalog for details.


Econ 86: Accounting for Decision Making - 3-week intensive

May 22 - June 12, 2013
Professor Peter Bergevin
MTWRF 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Principles of financial accounting. Analysis of business transactions and their effect on the three principal financial statements: the balance sheet, the income statement, and the cash flow statement of changes.


Econ 101: Intermediate Microeconomics - 6-week

May 22 - July 3, 2013
Professor S. Brock Blomberg
MWF 1:30 - 4:00 pm
SEE COURSE OVERVIEW

An analysis of the determination of price and output under various market conditions, from competition to monopoly. Theories of economic choice are applied to consumers, producers, and resource owners. Techniques of partial equilibrium analysis are stressed.


Econ 102: Intermediate Macroeconomics - 6-week

May 22 - July 3, 2013
Professor Manfred Keil
MWF 9:30 am - 12:00 pm

The theoretical background for understanding macroeconomic problems and policy options. Topics include evolution of macro thought; the IS-LM system and some alternatives; theories of consumption, investment, and money; unemployment; inflation; interest; monetarism; rational expectations; and supply side policies.


Econ 120: Statistics - 6-week

May 22 - July 3, 2013
Professor Manfred Keil
MWF 1:30 - 4:00 pm

Introduction to probability theory and the logic of statistical inference with applications to economics and business. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, decision theory, and regression analysis.


Econ 140: The World Economy - 3-week intensive

May 22 - July 3, 2013
Professor Graham Bird
MWF 9:30 am - 12:00 pm

A survey of international trade, financial markets, and monetary relations, including their analytical foundations, empirical and institutional manifestations, and policy implications.


Govt 95: Legal Studies: Intro to Law - 3-week intensive

May 22 - June 12, 2013
Professor Ralph Rossum
MTWRF 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

This course is intended to illuminate law by studying it with ideas and methods from several of the other disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. It is also intended to help the students unify their grasp of these disciplines by using them in the study of law considered as a central social phenomenon. Faculty members from several disciplines participate in the course.


Govt 137: Special Topics in Government: Marketing Management in Business, Public, and Social Sectors - 3-week intensive

May 22 - June 12, 2013
Professor Constance Rossum
MTWRF 1:00 - 4:00 pm

The goal of this introductory course, developed for future leaders and marketing practitioners, is to enhance students' ability to understand the role of marketing in government, business and the nonprofit sectors. Using case studies and classic articles, students will explore why some marketing strategies are successful and others fail. It will also review widely used research methods, as the foundation of effective marketing, and the use of copy testing methods to gauge the effectiveness of advertising before final production and implementation. Finally, it will focus on the growing importance of social media as a communication vehicle.


Hist 54: Bread and Circuses in Ancient Rome - 3-week intensive

May 22 - June 12, 2013
Professor Shane Bjornlie
MTWRF 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

This course explores various categories of Roman culture that defined both private lives and the public image of society. Topics include wealth, patronage, gender, slavery, violence, and death. By examining a variety of primary sources - histories, poetry, letter, and urban fabric - we shall better appreciate the ways in which private life in ancient Rome was a public performance.


Math 30: Calculus I - 3-week intensive

May 22 - June 12, 2013
Professor Lenny Fukshansky
MTWRF 1:00 - 4:00 pm

Single variable calculus. Differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications to the social and physical sciences.


Math 31: Calculus II - 6-week

May 22 - July 3, 2013
Professor Sam Nelson
MWF 9:30 am - 12:00 pm

A continuation of Mathematics 30. Techniques and applications of integration; introduction to differential equations; improper integrals and indeterminate forms; infinite series and power series representation of a function. Applications to problems from the social and physical sciences. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30 or placement.


Phil 30: Philosophical Questions - 3-week intensive

May 22 - June 12, 2013
Professor Suzanne Obdrzalek
MTWRF 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

This course offers an introduction to philosophy. Some instructors focus primarily on historical texts, while others focus on contemporary readings; some survey a range of philosophical questions, while others compare how different authors deal with one core topic. All courses focus on teaching philosophical methods, including the skills of interpreting and evaluating arguments in a rigorous fashion.


Psych 037: Organizational Psychology - 3-week intensive

May 22 - June 12, 2013
Professor Ronald Riggio
MTWRF 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Applies psychological theory and research to problems of work and other organizations. Topics include individual motivation and satisfaction, group dynamics and productivity, leadership, organizational structure, and the effects of external environments on internal organizational processes.


Rlst 138: American Religious History - 3-week intensive

May 22 - June 12, 2013
Professor Gastón Espinosa
MTWRF 1:00 - 4:00 pm

This seminar analyzes American religious history from colonialism to the present through readings, speakers, films, and field trips. It will discuss the history and beliefs of Native American, Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, Occult, and alternative traditions in the U.S. and analyze how they have brought about social change in society. Topics explored include: Religion, Deism & Founding Fathers; 1st & 2nd Great Awakenings; Religion, Slavery & Abolition; Religion & Science; The Social Gospel & Liberation Theologies; Vatican II; Religion and Black & Latino Civil Rights Movements; Feminism, Evangelicalism & Pentecostalism; The Religious Right & Left; and Church-State Debates.